Lauren Natbony, MD - Integrative Headache Medicine
Headache & Migraine Specialist Dr. Lauren R. Natbony is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology in the Division of Headache and Facial Pain at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. Dr. Natbony is the Associate Director of North Shore Headache and Spine, an integrative headache center that combines mainstream medical therapies, interventional treatments, and complementary modalities to provide comprehensive headache care. Dr. Natbony received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and her medical degree from the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, completing her internship in Internal Medicine and her residency in Neurology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, her fellowship in Headache Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and advanced training and certification in medical acupuncture at Harvard Medical School. She is board certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and in Headache Medicine by the United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties.
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Integrative Headache Medicine

A whole-person approach
to Headache & Migraine Relief

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December 7, 2021
Migraine & Gluten: Is there a connection?
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Dr. Lauren R. Natbony

Castle Connolly Top Doctor
New York Super Doctor

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About Dr. Lauren Natbony

Headache & Migraine Specialist Dr. Lauren R. Natbony is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology in the Division of Headache and Facial Pain at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. She is the Associate Director of North Shore Headache and Spine, an integrative headache center that combines mainstream medical therapies, interventional treatments, and complementary modalities to provide comprehensive headache care. Dr. Natbony received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and her medical degree from the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, completing her internship in Internal Medicine and her residency in Neurology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, her fellowship in Headache Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and advanced training and certification in medical acupuncture at Harvard Medical School. She is board certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and in Headache Medicine by the United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties.

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The Integrative Headache Medicine Approach

LIFESTYLE

Exercise

Studies for migraine have shown that regular cardiovascular exercise for 30-40 minutes 3-4 days per week is just as effective as a daily medication for prevention of migraine. Exercise triggers the body to produce endorphins, which are natural pain relievers. These endorphins will decrease migraine frequency and severity.

Sleeping

The average amount of sleep an adult needs is 8-9 hours per night. However, in migraine, it is the sleep schedule, not the duration of sleep that is of utmost importance. Migraineurs should maintain a regular sleep schedule, going to bed at the same time every night and waking up the same time every morning, on weekdays and weekends.

Eating

Migraine suffers should eat regular meals throughout the day, every 3-4 hours as drops in blood sugar can be a trigger. Studies have shown that breakfast is especially important, and that eating a protein filled breakfast get reduce migraine incidence. Diets containing vitamin B2 (found in green leafy vegetables) and CoQ10 (found in meats, fish and poultry) can be beneficial as they are both involved in energy production.

Drinking

Dehydration is a known migraine trigger. A minimum of 64oz of water should be consumed everyday. An extra ~16oz of water should be consumed for every half hour of exercise. Caffeinated beverages should be kept to a minimum as caffeine can be both a trigger for migraine and a cause of dehydration. Caffeine intake should be less than 200mg (~2 cups of coffee) per day.

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  • A version of this post appears online at https://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/features/cm/blame-sourdough-for-migraines Gluten: a family of proteins found in grains, including wheat, rye, spelt, and barley. Celiac Disease: an autoimmune condition that can cause damage to the intestines if gluten is not eliminated from the diet. Gluten sensitivity: may cause digestive symptoms similar to those of celiac disease but does not cause intestinal damage or trigger the production of antibodies to gluten. Can celiac disease or gluten sensitivity trigger migraine? I have a lot of patients who ask about gluten and its impact on migraine. There have been various studies examining the relationship between celiac......

  • Thrilled to announce the publication of my book, Integrative Headache Medicine – An Evidence-Based Guide for Clinicians. Thanks to all the contributing authors for your amazing work!...

  • Migraine headaches can be debilitating, and undue stress can exacerbate the condition, creating new problems. Lauren R. Natbony, MD, a Headache Specialist at the Mount Sinai Center for Headache and Facial Pain and an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, provides some suggestions for how to manage your headaches when life gets stressful. What’s the difference between a migraine and a regular headache? Headache is a catchall term for any type of pain in the head. Almost everyone has experienced a headache in his or her life. Migraine, however, is more than just......